Bo Staffs

 

The Japanese Bo Staffs as a Weapon


From the 14th century onward in Japan, the use of a wooden pole or staff as weapon came to be set down in a more formal system. In fact the oldest schools of martial art in Japan, the Tenshin Shōden Katori Shintō-ryū, first put into writing the basic movements, stances and uses of the Bo as a weapon that are practiced to this day.

There are a few reasons for why this staff came to be used as a weapon in Japan, with the main one being that most people not of the samurai ruling class in the 14th or 15th centuries weren't allowed to possess a sword, or bows and arrows. Just about any so-called “real” weapon, for that matter, was off-limits. People being people the world over, there soon came to life an effort to take everyday tools or items, such as a type of farming sickle, or a walking stick (in the case of the Bo), and turn them into something they could use to defend themselves against those who were trying to do them harm in some way.

After some time, the practice and use of the weapon known as the Bo came to be called Bojutsu, or “the study of the Bo.” In Japan, the practice of almost any martial art has as its second and third syllables the word “jutsu,” (joot-soo”). For instance, someone who practices ancient Ninja (a kind of assassin-for-hire in old Japan) techniques was said to be studying Ninjutsu. More on that in later articles.

Over the decades and centuries in Japan, a couple of different types of Bo Staffs developed. All share a basic shape, for sure, but some differ in their diameters, length, and how they taper or don’t taper at their ends. For the most part, the classic Bo Staffs is about six to six-and-a-half feet long and anywhere from three-quarters of an inch in diameter, ranging all the way up to three-and-a-half-inches around. Now, 3.5 inches is quite a big difference in size, so you probably will not see too many of those examples around today.

The Bo Staffs may also have a straight, blunt end with no tapering, or indeed have a taper running along its shaft down to each end. That is usually a matter of preference among each student of the Bo. Here at Buki Yuushuu we are skilled in the art of wooden Bo production, and many fine examples of the staff can be seen here on our website.

The length and size of the classic Bo usually was fitted to the size of the student who was learning how to use it. Shorter lengths and thinner diameters were normal for younger and smaller students. The longer and thicker ones were mostly used by more mature and bigger students. Really, though…the skill of the martial artist was more a factor in which Bō he or she preferred to use, and many artists were just as able to use smaller ones as larger and longer ones.

Here at Buki Yuushuu, there are a wide variety of Bo staffs made with the needs of each individual martial artist in mind. Modern versions of this very old weapon take as the source of our design the very first wooden staffs used by students of the 14th century’s Tenshin Shōden Katori Shintō-ryū school of martial arts.


The Bō Staff as a Tool, Not a Toy


When we look at what a wooden staff or pole is, we see just that:  Something made of wood that’s shaped like a stick or a pole, for the most part.  But, when we hear the words “Bō staff,” as martial artists, we think of something else completely different.  In fact, many of  us could be picturing ourselves in a nice stance, holding the staff as taught to us by our Sensei (“sen-say”), or instructor, getting ready to throw it around in what’s called a Figure-Eight move, or use it in a Front Spin move.  The list of possible techniques we can use to defend ourselves against attack is endless, because there are so many combinations that can be joined to together to make up a form, or kata, in Bōjutsu, the study of using the Bō as a self-defense weapon.

In almost every situation, it helps us to think of the Bō as an extension of ourselves when we use it.  If we move forward in an overhead downward strike, after blocking a blow from some opponent, we may follow up after the strike with a side kick or a leg sweep to make sure the person who we’re defending ourselves against will go down or at least won’t counter our own overhead strike with one of his or her own.  The point is that the Bō can’t usually be separated from the body.  We use both, and it doesn’t matter to us if we like the Japanese version of self defense in using the Bō more than we like the Chinese system of using the Guan, which is their name for the wooden staff.  Also, we always must use it with clear thought and clear focus.  In other words, we don’t let what we’re thinking about in our heads get in the way of what we’re doing in the time we’re working with a wooden staff like the Bō.

Many times, students run into problems when they begin studying how to use a wooden staff for self-defense against attackers because they forget that it’s nothing more than another way in which their bodies and minds come together for a single purpose.  They also fail to understand that their bodies and minds are unable to complete the joining up without the active help of the spirit they all have within them.  This “spirit,” in martial arts is more than just the kind of spirit a group of high school cheerleaders work so hard to cause at a basketball game, for example.

What we really mean by spirit in the martial arts is what happens when you’re really focused on the Bō right at that moment in time, and when you’re really, really happy and confident that you know what you need to do with the staff almost without knowing it on any conscious level.  Think about a time when you were practicing in the dojo (“dough-joe”) with a Bō and every movement or strike or block came very easy to you, and your technique was great, and you weren’t even sweating, and you could almost see the attack by your opponent before he or she even thought of doing it themselves.  That’s what we mean by making your mind and body into a single unit, which is held together by the actions of your spirit.

In the end, you must realize that any good Bō is a tool to help you, and be an extension of yourself.  Your energy will flow from your body to it and then from it back to you.  If you can make that positive energy on a regular basis, your skill with the Bō will increase with each day or week.

The people at Buki Yuushuu recognize that a Bō is not a toy, and yet can also be a highly personal weapon to each student.  Please see the online catalog at bukiyuushuu.com for finely crafted examples of what a serious Bō can look like.


Are You Ready to Pick Up the Bō Staff?


Have you ever seen a martial artist in person or in a movie pick up a wooden staff or pole and do things with it that seem to be impossible for normal human beings to pull off?  And do you wish you had the ability to do the same things with the Bō (the Japanese word for the staff) that somebody like Jet Li does with the Chinese version of it (the Guan)?  Watch just about any Li movie and you’ll see how the producers usually find some way to get him into the position where he has to pick up his Guan and use it to defend himself and others from people meaning to do them harm, like in the movie “Once Upon a Time in China” or any of its sequels.  A couple of fantastic wooden staff action clips from the film can be seen on You Tube, by the way.  Or rent Jackie Chan and Jet Li’s “The Forbidden Kingdom,” a 2008 movie that highlights very strong wooden staff techniques.

Now, if you answered “yes” to any of those questions we asked you in the previous paragraph, then congratulations, because you’ve started down a path that can truly help you to better physical, mental and spiritual well-being.  In Japan, Bōjutsu (the study of how and when to use the wooden staff) is taken very seriously.  Mainly, this is because the Japanese and others in Asia -- and around the world, nowadays -- understand that executing a smooth, controlled and effective strike and counterstrike with the Bō requires something a little bit more deep than just stabbing to the front, or sweeping to the side, or doing any number of things in a purely memorized, rote kind of way.  When you use the staff like that, chances are you’ve only gotten about one-third of the potential from the weapon, and from yourself, to be honest.  For sure, the body has gotten involved with the movement, and maybe the mind, in a small way (you had to think about swinging the Bō or Guan, after all), but there should be more.

Ask yourself:  Did you really feel “good” about what you were doing?  Were your techniques more than just memory and automatic movement in executing a Figure-Eight defense and attack with your Bō?  If you didn’t feel joy in your movement and if you really weren’t all that aware of how your mind and your body interacted during the staff form, or kata, then maybe your martial spirit wasn’t all there.  Like a tiny plant in a garden that needs sunlight and water to grow, so too does your spirit.  And when it finally matures, you may just feel like you could do any technique and movement ever put down in a book or on paper.  You may even invent a few of your own!

Bōjutsu can be easy, and it can be hard.  Sometimes, it’s both at the same time and in the same movement, or block, or sweep.  The effort put into it, and what you get out of it, will be completely up to you, the student.  Know that there are several different styles, or schools, that exist for study of the Bō.  The most popular ones are either Japanese or Chinese in origin, and you can’t go wrong by studying either or both of the ways in which the staff is used by martial arts students in the two countries.

In you think you’re ready to mold your mind, body, and soul (spirit) into one unit through study of the Bō, go first to bukiyuushuu.com and look over their selection of quality, handcrafted and very-modern versions of this popular and effective self-defense weapon.  You’ll be glad you did!


The Japanese Bō Staff as a Weapon


From the 14th century onward in Japan, the use of a wooden pole or staff as weapon came to be set down in a more formal system.  In fact the oldest schools of martial art in Japan, the Tenshin Shōden Katori Shintō-ryū, first put into writing the basic movements, stances and uses of the Bō as a weapon that are practiced to this day.

There are a few reasons for why this staff came to be used as a weapon in Japan, with the main one being that most people not of the samurai ruling class in the 14th or 15th centuries weren’t allowed to possess a sword, or bows and arrows.  Just about any so-called “real” weapon, for that matter, was off-limits.  People being people the world over, there soon came to life an effort to take everyday tools or items, such as a type of farming sickle, or a walking stick (in the case of the Bō), and turn them into something they could use to defend themselves against those who were trying to do them harm in some way.

After some time, the practice and use of the weapon known as the Bō came to be called Bōjutsu, or “the study of the Bō.”  In Japan, the practice of almost any martial art has as its second and third syllables the word “jutsu,” (joot-soo”).  For instance, someone who practices ancient Ninja (a kind of assassin-for-hire in old Japan) techniques was said to be studying Ninjutsu.  More on that in later articles.

Over the decades and centuries in Japan, a couple of different types of Bō developed.  All share a basic shape, for sure, but some differ in their diameters, length, and how they taper or don’t taper at their ends.  For the most part, the classic Bō is about six to six-and-a-half feet long and anywhere from three-quarters of an inch in diameter, ranging all the way up to three-and-a-half-inches around.  Now, 3.5 inches is quite a big difference in size, so you probably will not see too many of those examples around today.

The Bō staffmay also have a straight, blunt end with no tapering, or indeed have a taper running along its shaft down to each end.  That is usually a matter of preference among each student of the Bō.  The craftsmen at bukiyuushuu.com are skilled in the art of wooden Bō production, and many fine examples of the staff can be seen on the website.

The length and size of the classic Bō usually was fitted to the size of the student who was learning how to use it.  Shorter lengths and thinner diameters were normal for younger and smaller students.  The longer and thicker ones were mostly used by more mature and bigger students.  Really, though…the skill of the martial artist was more a factor in which Bō he or she preferred to use, and many artists were just as able to use smaller ones as larger and longer ones.

At Buki Yuushuu, there are a wide variety of Bō staffs made with the needs of each individual martial artist in mind.  Modern versions of this very old weapon take as the source of their design the very first wooden staffs used by  students of the 14th century’s Tenshin Shōden Katori Shintō-ryū school of martial arts.

 

Wooden Weapon Staffs in Japan


Probably everybody’s seen a long wooden walking stick or pole at one time or another.  Versions of such a tool have been described in the Bible and in writings by ancient Greek historians like Homer.  When it wasn’t being used by the hardy traveler to ease his journey on the roads or trails of olden days, it probably was being used in some manner to help keep him safe from bandits or even wolves and the occasional cougar or mountain lion.  Wooden sticks, in fact, have so many uses it’s hard to imagine a time when we didn’t use them as a tool to carry buckets over the shoulder, for example, or as a weapon of some sort.

In Asia, people in many countries or regions were just as familiar with the idea of the wooden pole or stick as both an aid in travel and as a means of self-defense from those who meant harm.  In pre-gunpowder days, a nicely shaped and carved wooden staff could mean the difference between getting to where you wanted to go with all your property intact, or maybe losing your money and in some cases, your life.  Times could be hard, and those who weren’t willing, or were unable, to defend themselves could struggle sometimes.

As a result of these conditions, the wooden staff, especially in Japan and China, began to become more than just a thing to walk with, or swing wildly and blindly at some robber or thief or animal taking off after the food you had stored in your knapsack.  In fact, a whole system for using it as a weapon grew up over the centuries, and continues to this day.

Most historians believe the earliest recorded on-purpose uses of the wooden staff as a weapon (in Japanese, it’s called a Bō…“bow”) come from the writings of one of the oldest formal martial arts in Japan, the Tenshin Shōden Katori Shintō-ryū, first founded in 1387 by Iizasa Chōisai Ienao.  It’s absolutely certain that the Bō was being used in self-defense before that date, of course.  But the first time many of the techniques a person could employ to use it in such a manner go back to Ienao-san.  After his death he was honored by Buddhist temple priests with the name Taiganin-den-Taira-no-Ason-Iga-no-Kami-Raiodo-Hon-Daikoji, which is quite a mouthful!

The typical Bō staff of the time ran nearly six feet in length.  In Japanese, we’d say that it was rokushakubō (“row-koo-shah-koo-bow”…six feet).  Back then, they usually were about one and a quarter-inch in thickness, which made them easy enough to handle with one hand, but also heavy enough to do serious harm if used the right way.  A Bō staff was a common sight among travelers or classes of people in Japan of every rank and status, including the elite samurai (“sah-moo-rye”).  Its simplicity and ruggedness reflected the martial spirit of Japan known as Bushidō, or “Way of the Warrior,” and the study of how to use a Bō in self-defense was, and still is, called Bōjutsu (“Bow-joots,” or “Bow-joot-soo,” if you pronounce the ‘u’ correctly at the end).  Many of the staff techniques involved in Bōjutsu center on slashing, swinging, stabbing, or poking with it.

If you’d like to see modern and highly personalized versions of this classic Japanese martial arts weapon, just go over to bukiyuushuu.com.  With many different colors and the application of a secret lacquer, the staff made by the craftsmen at Buki Yuushuu draws a direct line from today back to the time when 14th century students of the art of the were picking out their own first staff.

   
Bo Staffs In The Martial Arts Community – 7 Extra BowStaff Content
Bo Staff Prior to the 15th century, Okinawa, a small island located south of Japan, was divided into three kingdoms: Chuzan, Hokuzan, and Nanzan. After much political turmoil, Okinawa was united under the Sho Dynasty in 1429. In 1477, Emperor Sho Shin came into power. Determined to enforce his philosophical and ethical ideas, while banning feudalism, the emperor instituted a ban on weapons. It became a crime to carry or own weapons such as swords, in an attempt to prevent further turmoil and prevent uprising.

Bo Staff Collapsible

The bō is usually made with hard wood or a flexible wood, such as red or white oak, although bamboo and pine wood have been used, more common still is rattan wood for its flexibility. The bō may be tapered in that it can be thicker in the center (chukon-bu) than at the ends (kontei) and usually round or circular (maru-bo). Some bō are very light, with metallic sides, stripes and a grip which are used for XMA and competitions/demonstrations. Older bō were round (maru-bo), square (kaku-bo), hexagon (rokkaku-bo) or octagon (hakkaku-bo). The average size of a bō is 6 shaku (around 6 ft (1.8 m)) but they can be as long as 9 ft (2.7 m) (kyu-shaku-bō).

Bo Staff Amazon

In the 2014 movie Donnie has a retractable spring loaded metal staff, which is much more resistant and stronger than its wooden version from previous incarnations. In the trailers Donnie uses it to reflect bullets, throw a car up in the air and push a container against Foot Soldiers. In the sequel movie, he has also added a taser to one end, allowing him to zap others with it and even use it to interface with plane controls.

Bo Staff Skills

The bō is typically gripped in thirds, and when held horizontally in front, the right palm is facing away from the body and the left hand is facing the body, enabling the staff to rotate. The power is generated by the back hand pulling the staff, while the front hand is used for guidance. Bō technique includes a wide variety of blocks, strikes, sweeps, and entrapments. The bō may even be used to sweep sand into an attacker’s eyes.

Bo Staff With Hidden Blade

Don's bo has been modified to be able to project a blade, turning it into a Naginata, which is a kind of traditional Japanese Halberd. The weapon has grip tape wrapped around the middle. Unfortunately, Don's bo easily breaks when used against Kraang robots. In the episode "Metalhead", Donatello developed a robot to fight for him as he felt that his bo was inadequate against the alien technology they were currently facing, but came to accept his weapon of choice after he was able to defeat Metalhead when it fell under Kraang control (Although he attempted to turn his bo into a rocket launcher). bo staff Although the bō is now used as a weapon, its use is believed by some to have evolved from the long stick (tenbin) which was used to balance buckets or baskets. Typically, one would carry baskets of harvested crops or buckets of water or fish etc., one at each end of the tenbin, that is balanced across the middle of the back at the shoulder blades. In poorer agrarian economies, the tenbin remains a traditional farm work implement. In styles such as Yamanni-ryū or Kenshin-ryū, many of the strikes are the same as those used for yari ("spear") or naginata ("glaive"). There are stick fighting techniques native to just about every country on every continent.[citation needed] A 6 ft (1.8 m) bō is sometimes called a rokushakubō (六尺棒: ろくしゃくぼう). This name derives from the Japanese words roku (六: ろく), meaning "six"; shaku (尺: しゃく); and bō. The shaku is a Japanese measurement equivalent to 30.3 centimeters (0.994 ft). Thus, rokushakubō refers to a staff about 6-shaku (1.82 m; 5.96 feet) long. The bō is typically 3 cm (1.25 inch) thick, sometimes gradually tapering from the middle (chukon-bu) to 2 cm (0.75 inch)at the end (kontei). This thickness allows the user to make a tight fist around it in order to block and counter an attack. In 1609, the temporary peace established by Sho Shin was violently overthrown when the powerful Shimazu clan of Satsuma invaded and conquered Okinawa. The Shimazu lords placed a new weapons ban, leaving the Okinawans defenseless against samurai weaponry. In an attempt to protect themselves, the people of Okinawa looked to simple farming implements, which the samurai would not be able to confiscate, as new methods of defense. This use of weapons developed into kobudo, or "ancient martial way" as known today. The earliest form of the bō, a staff, has been used throughout Asia since the beginning of recorded history. The first bo were called ishibo, and were made of wood (branches, etc. was common?)[citation needed]. These were hard to make and were often unreliable. These were also extremely heavy. The konsaibo was a very distant variant of the kanabo. They were made from wood studded with iron. These were still too cumbersome for actual combat, so they were later replaced by unmodified hardwood staffs. Used for self-defense by monks or commoners, the staff was an integral part of the Tenshin Shōden Katori Shintō-ryū, one of the martial arts’ oldest surviving styles. The staff evolved into the bō with the foundation of kobudo, a martial art using weapons, which emerged in Okinawa in the early 17th century. In some cases for training purposes or for a different style, rattan was used. Some were inlaid or banded with strips of iron or other metals for extra strength. Bō range from heavy to light, from rigid to highly flexible, and from simple pieces of wood picked up from the side of the road to ornately decorated works of art.

Bo Staff With Blade

The Japanese martial art of wielding the bō is bōjutsu. The basis of bō technique is te, or hand, techniques derived from quanfa and other martial arts that reached Okinawa via trade and Chinese monks. Thrusting, swinging, and striking techniques often resemble empty-hand movements, following the philosophy that the bō is merely an "extension of one’s limbs". Consequently, bōjutsu is often incorporated into other styles of empty hand fighting, such as karate. It should be noted that the "bō" is also used as a spear and long sword in some of its motions, such as upward swing and slashing motion across the body as well as extensions by gripping one end and thus increasing its length as thus making it similar to a spear. The bō is Donatello's weapon of choice. The bo is a versatile weapon, able to defend as well as attack. Its length allows the user to keep enemies at a distance and twirling the staff quickly can block attacks. ---- More Great Bo Staff Content Continues below -----   Bo Staff Fighting The bō is usually made with hard wood or a flexible wood, such as red or white oak, although bamboo and pine wood have been used, more common still is rattan wood for its flexibility. The bō may be tapered in that it can be thicker in the center (chukon-bu) than at the ends (kontei) and usually round or circular (maru-bo). Some bō are very light, with metallic sides, stripes and a grip which are used for XMA and competitions/demonstrations. Older bō were round (maru-bo), square (kaku-bo), hexagon (rokkaku-bo) or octagon (hakkaku-bo). The average size of a bō is 6 shaku (around 6 ft (1.8 m)) but they can be as long as 9 ft (2.7 m) (kyu-shaku-bō).

Bo Staff Amazon

The Japanese martial art of wielding the bō is bōjutsu. The basis of bō technique is te, or hand, techniques derived from quanfa and other martial arts that reached Okinawa via trade and Chinese monks. Thrusting, swinging, and striking techniques often resemble empty-hand movements, following the philosophy that the bō is merely an "extension of one’s limbs". Consequently, bōjutsu is often incorporated into other styles of empty hand fighting, such as karate. It should be noted that the "bō" is also used as a spear and long sword in some of its motions, such as upward swing and slashing motion across the body as well as extensions by gripping one end and thus increasing its length as thus making it similar to a spear. The bō is typically gripped in thirds, and when held horizontally in front, the right palm is facing away from the body and the left hand is facing the body, enabling the staff to rotate. The power is generated by the back hand pulling the staff, while the front hand is used for guidance. Bō technique includes a wide variety of blocks, strikes, sweeps, and entrapments. The bō may even be used to sweep sand into an attacker’s eyes.

Bo Staff Skills

The bō is usually made with hard wood or a flexible wood, such as red or white oak, although bamboo and pine wood have been used, more common still is rattan wood for its flexibility. The bō may be tapered in that it can be thicker in the center (chukon-bu) than at the ends (kontei) and usually round or circular (maru-bo). Some bō are very light, with metallic sides, stripes and a grip which are used for XMA and competitions/demonstrations. Older bō were round (maru-bo), square (kaku-bo), hexagon (rokkaku-bo) or octagon (hakkaku-bo). The average size of a bō is 6 shaku (around 6 ft (1.8 m)) but they can be as long as 9 ft (2.7 m) (kyu-shaku-bō). In some cases for training purposes or for a different style, rattan was used. Some were inlaid or banded with strips of iron or other metals for extra strength. Bō range from heavy to light, from rigid to highly flexible, and from simple pieces of wood picked up from the side of the road to ornately decorated works of art. Prior to the 15th century, Okinawa, a small island located south of Japan, was divided into three kingdoms: Chuzan, Hokuzan, and Nanzan. After much political turmoil, Okinawa was united under the Sho Dynasty in 1429. In 1477, Emperor Sho Shin came into power. Determined to enforce his philosophical and ethical ideas, while banning feudalism, the emperor instituted a ban on weapons. It became a crime to carry or own weapons such as swords, in an attempt to prevent further turmoil and prevent uprising. A 6 ft (1.8 m) bō is sometimes called a rokushakubō (六尺棒: ろくしゃくぼう). This name derives from the Japanese words roku (六: ろく), meaning "six"; shaku (尺: しゃく); and bō. The shaku is a Japanese measurement equivalent to 30.3 centimeters (0.994 ft). Thus, rokushakubō refers to a staff about 6-shaku (1.82 m; 5.96 feet) long. The bō is typically 3 cm (1.25 inch) thick, sometimes gradually tapering from the middle (chukon-bu) to 2 cm (0.75 inch)at the end (kontei). This thickness allows the user to make a tight fist around it in order to block and counter an attack. The earliest form of the bō, a staff, has been used throughout Asia since the beginning of recorded history. The first bo were called ishibo, and were made of wood (branches, etc. was common?)[citation needed]. These were hard to make and were often unreliable. These were also extremely heavy. The konsaibo was a very distant variant of the kanabo. They were made from wood studded with iron. These were still too cumbersome for actual combat, so they were later replaced by unmodified hardwood staffs. Used for self-defense by monks or commoners, the staff was an integral part of the Tenshin Shōden Katori Shintō-ryū, one of the martial arts’ oldest surviving styles. The staff evolved into the bō with the foundation of kobudo, a martial art using weapons, which emerged in Okinawa in the early 17th century. bo staff form In 1609, the temporary peace established by Sho Shin was violently overthrown when the powerful Shimazu clan of Satsuma invaded and conquered Okinawa. The Shimazu lords placed a new weapons ban, leaving the Okinawans defenseless against samurai weaponry. In an attempt to protect themselves, the people of Okinawa looked to simple farming implements, which the samurai would not be able to confiscate, as new methods of defense. This use of weapons developed into kobudo, or "ancient martial way" as known today.

Bo Staff Training

The earliest form of the bō, a staff, has been used throughout Asia since the beginning of recorded history. The first bo were called ishibo, and were made of wood (branches, etc. was common?)[citation needed]. These were hard to make and were often unreliable. These were also extremely heavy. The konsaibo was a very distant variant of the kanabo. They were made from wood studded with iron. These were still too cumbersome for actual combat, so they were later replaced by unmodified hardwood staffs. Used for self-defense by monks or commoners, the staff was an integral part of the Tenshin Shōden Katori Shintō-ryū, one of the martial arts’ oldest surviving styles. The staff evolved into the bō with the foundation of kobudo, a martial art using weapons, which emerged in Okinawa in the early 17th century.

Bo Staff Collapsible

Although the bō is now used as a weapon, its use is believed by some to have evolved from the long stick (tenbin) which was used to balance buckets or baskets. Typically, one would carry baskets of harvested crops or buckets of water or fish etc., one at each end of the tenbin, that is balanced across the middle of the back at the shoulder blades. In poorer agrarian economies, the tenbin remains a traditional farm work implement. In styles such as Yamanni-ryū or Kenshin-ryū, many of the strikes are the same as those used for yari ("spear") or naginata ("glaive"). There are stick fighting techniques native to just about every country on every continent.[citation needed]

Simple Staff

The bō is typically gripped in thirds, and when held horizontally in front, the right palm is facing away from the body and the left hand is facing the body, enabling the staff to rotate. The power is generated by the back hand pulling the staff, while the front hand is used for guidance. Bō technique includes a wide variety of blocks, strikes, sweeps, and entrapments. The bō may even be used to sweep sand into an attacker’s eyes. Although the bō is now used as a weapon, its use is believed by some to have evolved from the long stick (tenbin) which was used to balance buckets or baskets. Typically, one would carry baskets of harvested crops or buckets of water or fish etc., one at each end of the tenbin, that is balanced across the middle of the back at the shoulder blades. In poorer agrarian economies, the tenbin remains a traditional farm work implement. In styles such as Yamanni-ryū or Kenshin-ryū, many of the strikes are the same as those used for yari ("spear") or naginata ("glaive"). There are stick fighting techniques native to just about every country on every continent.[citation needed] In some cases for training purposes or for a different style, rattan was used. Some were inlaid or banded with strips of iron or other metals for extra strength. Bō range from heavy to light, from rigid to highly flexible, and from simple pieces of wood picked up from the side of the road to ornately decorated works of art.

Prior to the 15th century, Okinawa, a small island located south of Japan, was divided into three kingdoms: Chuzan, Hokuzan, and Nanzan. After much political turmoil, Okinawa was united under the Sho Dynasty in 1429. In 1477, Emperor Sho Shin came into power. Determined to enforce his philosophical and ethical ideas, while banning feudalism, the emperor instituted a ban on weapons. It became a crime to carry or own weapons such as swords, in an attempt to prevent further turmoil and prevent uprising. A 6 ft (1.8 m) bō is sometimes called a rokushakubō (六尺棒: ろくしゃくぼう). This name derives from the Japanese words roku (六: ろく), meaning "six"; shaku (尺: しゃく); and bō. The shaku is a Japanese measurement equivalent to 30.3 centimeters (0.994 ft). Thus, rokushakubō refers to a staff about 6-shaku (1.82 m; 5.96 feet) long. The bō is typically 3 cm (1.25 inch) thick, sometimes gradually tapering from the middle (chukon-bu) to 2 cm (0.75 inch)at the end (kontei). This thickness allows the user to make a tight fist around it in order to block and counter an attack.

Bo Staff For Sale

The Japanese martial art of wielding the bō is bōjutsu. The basis of bō technique is te, or hand, techniques derived from quanfa and other martial arts that reached Okinawa via trade and Chinese monks. Thrusting, swinging, and striking techniques often resemble empty-hand movements, following the philosophy that the bō is merely an "extension of one’s limbs". Consequently, bōjutsu is often incorporated into other styles of empty hand fighting, such as karate. It should be noted that the "bō" is also used as a spear and long sword in some of its motions, such as upward swing and slashing motion across the body as well as extensions by gripping one end and thus increasing its length as thus making it similar to a spear.   Bo Staff Length With all the choices out there, it can be hard to find a good staff for you. With a few tips however, you can quickly narrow down your options to a bo staff that works for you. The faster you can pick your bo staff out the faster you can enjoy your new weapon. For demonstrations you want to basicly look "cool" show off your skills. You will often prefer a light staff so that you can pull off faster moves. A flashy bo staff may also benefit you since you want people to focus on your bo staff. If you are planning on doing any kind of floor striking or using it for other purposes you may want to get a slightly heavier staff so that it can withstand the extra pressure. For a 6 foot demonstation bo staff, it should way around 9 oz. After performing a rising block, a possible counter attack is the reverse strike. To perform the reverse strike, start with the bo staff above your head in a rising-block position. Keep the staff parallel to the floor and rotate it counterclockwise. As you rotate the staff, lower it and bring your left hand under your right armpit. This motion should cause the right end of the staff to strike your opponent on the right side of his head or neck. The size of your bo staff is probably the most important factor when choosing a staff. If you get the wrong size staff you may not even be able to use it effectively. The average bo staff length is about 6 feet long but most people choose a staff a few inches longer or shorter than they are. A shorter staff will be easier to handle and will probably allow you to be faster. A longer staff, however, will give you a longer reach and possibly more power. In the 2014 movie Donnie has a retractable spring loaded metal staff, which is much more resistant and stronger than its wooden version from previous incarnations. In the trailers Donnie uses it to reflect bullets, throw a car up in the air and push a container against Foot Soldiers. In the sequel movie, he has also added a taser to one end, allowing him to zap others with it and even use it to interface with plane controls. A downward thrust is a basic technique you can use after you have knocked an opponent to the ground. To execute a downward thrust, hold the bo staff in a standard grip. Raise your right hand and lower your left hand so that the staff is tilted at about a 45-degree angle. Extend your right arm and bring your left hand across your chest. Forcefully thrust the low end of the staff downward at your opponent. The bō is Donatello's weapon of choice. The bo is a versatile weapon, able to defend as well as attack. Its length allows the user to keep enemies at a distance and twirling the staff quickly can block attacks. With strength and speed training, I would recommend a heavier staff to build your muscles and speed. This will really give you an edge in competitions when you would use a lighter staff. For strength and speed training you would want to use the heavier woods. With heavier bo staffs comes higher prices so you'll also want to compare prices. A heavier bo is also good if you tend to break staffs a lot during training.

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Combat training usually involves being hit with a staff or hitting someone else. This can be very painful and could easily break a rib or small bone. Because of this, we choose a different material bo staff. You will want a bo with a softer wood such as white wax or rattan. You may also consider foam covered bo staff for training. If you follow this guide you should be able to pick out a bo staff fairly quickly and be on your way back to training. Bo staffs shouldn't be extremely expensive, especially for training purposes. You spend a little more on show staff because they will have unique designs.

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Don's bo has been modified to be able to project a blade, turning it into a Naginata, which is a kind of traditional Japanese Halberd. The weapon has grip tape wrapped around the middle. Unfortunately, Don's bo easily breaks when used against Kraang robots. In the episode "Metalhead", Donatello developed a robot to fight for him as he felt that his bo was inadequate against the alien technology they were currently facing, but came to accept his weapon of choice after he was able to defeat Metalhead when it fell under Kraang control (Although he attempted to turn his bo into a rocket launcher).

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A basic sweep is performed similarly to a reverse strike. To perform a sweep, start in the same position that you ended up in on the reverse strike. One end of the bo staff should be under your armpit and the other end should be pointed straight out in front of you. Move the striking end of the bo staff toward your opponent’s ankles on the right side of his body. Quickly pivot your hips to the right as you sweep your opponent’s legs out from underneath him.

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The rising block is a basic technique used to defend against an overhead attack. To execute this block, hold the bo staff in a standard grip. Grab the staff so that your hands divide it into three equal sections. Your right palm should face up and your left palm should face down. To block, keep the weapon parallel to the floor and raise it above your head. The rising block can defend against a stick or sword strike aimed at your head. Make sure you block your opponent’s weapon with the middle section of your staff. Bo staffs come in different widths as well as lengths. You need to consider this when buying a bo staff. You should be able to make a solid grip at the widest part of the staff, so no matter where you grab you will have control.   Bo Staff For Sale Ebay We sell lots of products here at KarateMart. But we are often so busy designing new weapons and simply running our website for our loyal customers that we don't devote enough time and energy to show off our weapons and what awesome ninja moves can be done with our exclusive weapons. This is why w

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Little known to tourists and those looking to invest in property in Italy; Calabria offers a glimpse into a different Italy, as does the property in Calabria. Haunted by memories of more illustrious times when it was the site of rich and powerful Greek colonies, the architecture of property in Calabria often reflects such curiosities as Greek speaking villages and an Albanian community dating back 500 years. As well as a region rich in history, mountainous Calabria and the property in Calabria attracts hikers to its high level plains and alpine scenery in the Sila area; and for sun seekers, there is Calabria property in the ornate seaside towns with spectacular views. With the mountains on one side and 780km of coast, on the other, Calabria will take your breath away. Off the west coast of Italy lies Sardinia, the second largest island in the Mediterranean Sea after Sicily. Widely considered to provide some of Europe's most breathtaking coastline, property in Sardinia offers spectacular surroundings as the island boasts clear waters teeming with fish and shellfish, golden fields of wheat and cave pocked mountains covered with herds of sheep. An Island of extremes, which is reflected in the diversity of the property in Sardinia, Sardinia has blistering hot summers and cold, windy winters; it also offers an indigenous culture and way of life that will not fail to captivate and fascinate. Sardinia has long been a favourite holiday destination for the French and German, and with UK property buyers and tourists now exploring property in Sardinia, it looks set to become a popular destination. Apulia is a long and narrow region of southern Italy bordering the Adriatic Sea and eventually forming the heel of Italy's 'boot' in the Salento peninsula. Apulia is a great producer of wine and olive oil, and is rapidly becoming a very popular destination for tourists and investors alike as more begin looking into property in Apulia. Those looking for property in Apulia are often drawn to the Trulli district around Alberobello; the most striking feature of Apulia. A trullo is a round domed, often white property in Apulia; clusters of trulli create a beautiful and striking landscape. Lecce, one of Apulia's five provinces and famed for its baroque beauty, is one of the most attractive city destination for those wanting to buy property in Apulia, its golden sandstone and elegant 17th century architecture is a sight to behold.  

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Martial Arts Supply - Low Price Protection Guaranteed KungFu4less.com offers the lowest prices on all Top brand MARTIAL ARTS SUPPLIES. If you should find any MARTIAL ARTS SUPPLY advertised for less, let us know and we will beat it. You might want to consider the romantic sunsets and Renaissance architecture of property in Tuscany. With its charming medieval hill towns and fantastic capital Florence, Tuscany has long been a favourite spot for those looking to invest in property in Italy. From the tiniest hamlet to the magnificent Florence property in Tuscany is diverse and plentiful. With its quiet lanes, cypress trees and creamy coloured villas; property in Tuscany never ceases to enchant. The varied landscape of Tuscany and property in Tuscany is typical of what Italy has to offer. The basic purpose of the staff is increasing the force delivered in a strike, through leverage, and to benefit from the extra distance this weapon affords. The user's relatively slight motion, effected at the point of handling the staff, results in a faster, more forceful motion by the tip of the staff against the object or subject of the blow; thus enabling long-range crushing and sweeping strikes. The staff may also be thrust at an opponent, allowing one to hit from a distance. It also is used for joint-locks, thrusting of the staff that immobilize a target joint, which are used to non-fatally subdue an opponent. The staff is a weapon mainly used for self-defense, and can be used to execute several blocks and parries. Martial arts techniques, such as kicks and blocks, can also be combined with weapon techniques when practicing this martial art to enhance its effectiveness. Tiger Claw’s Jo and Bo staffs are made from select hardwood, wax wood and superior grade rattan. The hardwoods are heavy weight and have a fine, splinter resistant finish that allows hands to slide smoothly and quickly. Our rattan staffs are light weight and flexible with the perfect “snap-back” to show the power behind the strikes. bo staff for sale malaysia It's tempting to think of Italy as the country with everything - but that's exactly what it seems to have! Incredible scenery, some of the finest artwork and architecture on the planet, mouth-watering cuisine, fine wines, beautiful beaches, quaint villages, bustling cities and, of course, plenty of property for sale. Property in Italy ranges from cottages in the Tuscan hills to apartments in the centre of Rome. So, where do you begin when choosing a property in Italy? Umbria offers similar treats, but it lesser known and less crowded than some parts of Tuscany. Abruzzo and the stunning northern Dolomites are ideal for anyone looking for property in Italy nestled in the mountains. Lazio is home to the incredible city of Rome, with its historic architecture, ruins and ancient monuments. Other cities such as Milan, with its elegant style and Venice, famous for its canals, are wonderful places to find property in Italy. Whatever your tastes and budget, there is sure to be a property in Italy to suit you!

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Property in Le Marche is ideal for who love beach holidays. Le Marche boasts 180km of Adriatic coastline and a host of seaside resorts, both of the lively variety as well as property in Le Marche for the more subdued quiet type of beach getaway. A truly contrasting region; also reflected in the property in Le Marche; rolling hills and mountain ranges, grottos and lakes, wood clad slopes and medieval towns and villages can be found just one hour from the coastline of Le Marche. Good food and wine, spectacular art and architecture, as well as skiing, horse riding and hang gliding can all be enjoyed in Le Marche. Property in Le March has steadily become a popular choice for Rightmove Overseas users.     Are Bo Staffs Illegal Prior to the 15th century, Okinawa, a small island located south of Japan, was divided into three kingdoms: Chuzan, Hokuzan, and Nanzan. After much political turmoil, Okinawa was united under the Sho Dynasty in 1429. In 1477, Emperor Sho Shin came into power. Determined to enforce his philosophical and ethical ideas, while banning feudalism, the emperor instituted a ban on weapons. It became a crime to carry or own weapons such as swords, in an attempt to prevent further turmoil and prevent uprising. A downward thrust is a basic technique you can use after you have knocked an opponent to the ground. To execute a downward thrust, hold the bo staff in a standard grip. Raise your right hand and lower your left hand so that the staff is tilted at about a 45-degree angle. Extend your right arm and bring your left hand across your chest. Forcefully thrust the low end of the staff downward at your opponent. After performing a rising block, a possible counter attack is the reverse strike. To perform the reverse strike, start with the bo staff above your head in a rising-block position. Keep the staff parallel to the floor and rotate it counterclockwise. As you rotate the staff, lower it and bring your left hand under your right armpit. This motion should cause the right end of the staff to strike your opponent on the right side of his head or neck. The earliest form of the bō, a staff, has been used throughout Asia since the beginning of recorded history. The first bo were called ishibo, and were made of wood (branches, etc. was common?)[citation needed]. These were hard to make and were often unreliable. These were also extremely heavy. The konsaibo was a very distant variant of the kanabo. They were made from wood studded with iron. These were still too cumbersome for actual combat, so they were later replaced by unmodified hardwood staffs. Used for self-defense by monks or commoners, the staff was an integral part of the Tenshin Shōden Katori Shintō-ryū, one of the martial arts’ oldest surviving styles. The staff evolved into the bō with the foundation of kobudo, a martial art using weapons, which emerged in Okinawa in the early 17th century. In 1609, the temporary peace established by Sho Shin was violently overthrown when the powerful Shimazu clan of Satsuma invaded and conquered Okinawa. The Shimazu lords placed a new weapons ban, leaving the Okinawans defenseless against samurai weaponry. In an attempt to protect themselves, the people of Okinawa looked to simple farming implements, which the samurai would not be able to confiscate, as new methods of defense. This use of weapons developed into kobudo, or "ancient martial way" as known today.

Are Bo Staffs Illegal

Combat training usually involves being hit with a staff or hitting someone else. This can be very painful and could easily break a rib or small bone. Because of this, we choose a different material bo staff. You will want a bo with a softer wood such as white wax or rattan. You may also consider foam covered bo staff for training. In some cases for training purposes or for a different style, rattan was used. Some were inlaid or banded with strips of iron or other metals for extra strength. Bō range from heavy to light, from rigid to highly flexible, and from simple pieces of wood picked up from the side of the road to ornately decorated works of art. Don's bo has been modified to be able to project a blade, turning it into a Naginata, which is a kind of traditional Japanese Halberd. The weapon has grip tape wrapped around the middle. Unfortunately, Don's bo easily breaks when used against Kraang robots. In the episode "Metalhead", Donatello developed a robot to fight for him as he felt that his bo was inadequate against the alien technology they were currently facing, but came to accept his weapon of choice after he was able to defeat Metalhead when it fell under Kraang control (Although he attempted to turn his bo into a rocket launcher).   If you follow this guide you should be able to pick out a bo staff fairly quickly and be on your way back to training. Bo staffs shouldn't be extremely expensive, especially for training purposes. You spend a little more on show staff because they will have unique designs. A basic sweep is performed similarly to a reverse strike. To perform a sweep, start in the same position that you ended up in on the reverse strike. One end of the bo staff should be under your armpit and the other end should be pointed straight out in front of you. Move the striking end of the bo staff toward your opponent’s ankles on the right side of his body. Quickly pivot your hips to the right as you sweep your opponent’s legs out from underneath him.

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The bō is usually made with hard wood or a flexible wood, such as red or white oak, although bamboo and pine wood have been used, more common still is rattan wood for its flexibility. The bō may be tapered in that it can be thicker in the center (chukon-bu) than at the ends (kontei) and usually round or circular (maru-bo). Some bō are very light, with metallic sides, stripes and a grip which are used for XMA and competitions/demonstrations. Older bō were round (maru-bo), square (kaku-bo), hexagon (rokkaku-bo) or octagon (hakkaku-bo). The average size of a bō is 6 shaku (around 6 ft (1.8 m)) but they can be as long as 9 ft (2.7 m) (kyu-shaku-bō).

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Although the bō is now used as a weapon, its use is believed by some to have evolved from the long stick (tenbin) which was used to balance buckets or baskets. Typically, one would carry baskets of harvested crops or buckets of water or fish etc., one at each end of the tenbin, that is balanced across the middle of the back at the shoulder blades. In poorer agrarian economies, the tenbin remains a traditional farm work implement. In styles such as Yamanni-ryū or Kenshin-ryū, many of the strikes are the same as those used for yari ("spear") or naginata ("glaive"). There are stick fighting techniques native to just about every country on every continent.[citation needed]

Bo Staff Buying Guide

For demonstrations you want to basicly look "cool" show off your skills. You will often prefer a light staff so that you can pull off faster moves. A flashy bo staff may also benefit you since you want people to focus on your bo staff. If you are planning on doing any kind of floor striking or using it for other purposes you may want to get a slightly heavier staff so that it can withstand the extra pressure. For a 6 foot demonstation bo staff, it should way around 9 oz. The bō is Donatello's weapon of choice. The bo is a versatile weapon, able to defend as well as attack. Its length allows the user to keep enemies at a distance and twirling the staff quickly can block attacks. The Japanese martial art of wielding the bō is bōjutsu. The basis of bō technique is te, or hand, techniques derived from quanfa and other martial arts that reached Okinawa via trade and Chinese monks. Thrusting, swinging, and striking techniques often resemble empty-hand movements, following the philosophy that the bō is merely an "extension of one’s limbs". Consequently, bōjutsu is often incorporated into other styles of empty hand fighting, such as karate. It should be noted that the "bō" is also used as a spear and long sword in some of its motions, such as upward swing and slashing motion across the body as well as extensions by gripping one end and thus increasing its length as thus making it similar to a spear.   Martial Arts Bo Staff Competition As set forth above under the limited warranty provisions, AWMA liability is limited to repair or replacement of its products which are returned to it prepaid in the specified period of time. In no event shall AWMA’s liability exceed the value of the products sold. AWMA shall not be liable for any special or consequential damages that result from the use of any product sold through this website or through its catalog. Applicable law may not allow the limitation or exclusion of liability of special or consequential damages so the above limitation or exclusion may not apply to your purchase, but it is intended to be the maximum limitation as permitted by law.  

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Sales of certain Weapons are governed by local, state, federal and/or international law. It is Your responsibility to check all applicable laws concerning the use, ownership, legal age and possession of any Weapon before purchasing. By purchasing any Weapon, You warrant that You are in compliance with all local, state, federal and/or international law, and that You are legally able to purchase, possess, and use, and AWMA is legally able to sell to You, all Weapons You purchase from AWMA's website, catalog, or other location. Product weights are approximate and are measured on an averaged ounce per square yard basis. Actual product weights may vary based on various factors, including, but not limited to, the color of the product. AWMA makes no express guarantees or warranties of any kind with respect to actual product weights. All weapons sold by AWMA (“Weapons”) are intended for demonstration or display as a collectible item only. Use or misuse of Weapons involves serious risks, including, but not limited to, injury, paralysis, disability, and death. Weapons are sold only for training under expert supervision, for demonstration of forms, collection or display. Inspect weapons before each use to ensure they are in proper condition. If any unsafe, damaged, or defective condition is observed, do not use the Product. Do not use Weapons for sparring or contact. The purchaser, user or participant assumes all risk of injury from any use. No Weapon shall be sold to anyone under 18 years of age without parental consent. Some Weapons may be prohibited in your area. Please check state statutes and local ordinances before ordering. Use of Products MUST be under the supervision of a skilled instructor who responsibly monitors techniques and intensity of training to assure that students or users are properly trained and physically conditioned. Minors using these Products should have constant, qualified, adult supervision.

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The Products might provide varying degrees of protection, but they are not warranted to protect the user from or prevent any injury, paralysis or death. Users are responsible for their choice and use of the Products purchased. Users of these Products can be subject to injuries, including, but not limited to, physical injury, paralysis, or death, despite using the Products as intended. The user must assume full responsibility for all risk of injuries. The manufacturer and distributor assume no liability for injuries, paralysis or death suffered while wearing or using the Products. martial arts bo staff for sale Before you allow others to use an AWMA product, you agree that (a) you will require that they (or their legal guardian if they are minors) read, understand, and agree to these Terms and Conditions of Sale or Use, (b) you believe they (or their guardian) understand that they are participating in a high-risk activity and assume the risk of death, paralysis, or other personal injury, and (c) you agree to indemnify, defend, and hold AWMA harmless from any claims made by them arising from their use of any Product.   Tiger Claw�s Elite Competition Bo is designed for the flash and dazzle of a champion competitor! Trimmed with mylar metallic and glitter tape, with a no-slip center grip. It breaks down into two pieces for easy transport. It also comes with fitted nylon carrying case.

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Products sold by AWMA include equipment and gear used in boxing, martial arts, mixed martial arts, yoga, fitness, weight training, kick-boxing, competitions and/or demonstration (collectively, “Martial Arts”). Participation in Martial Arts is a high-risk sports activity. Participation in Martial Arts may result in injury, sometimes severe, including, but not limited to, disability, paralysis, or death. You participate in any of these activities at your own risk. You agree to consult with your personal physician before participating in any of these high-risk activities. You, and whoever uses the Products sold by AWMA, use the Products at Your own risk. Read, understand, and follow specific warnings and instructions on Products and in product literature or inserts before using the Products. Save these documents for reference. Product descriptions, typographic, pricing and photographic errors are unintentional and subject to correction. We regret, but are not liable for such errors. AWMA reserves the right to reject any orders placed for a product listed at an incorrect price. If you discover an error in our website or catalog, please let us know. All mats purchased from AWMA must be used in accordance with the manufacturer’s warnings, manuals, and labels. Always place mats on a flat, level, even surface. Always follow the manufacturer’s recommended guidelines and disclaimers.

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Because Products wear down through use and over time, ALWAYS INSPECT ALL Products, including, but not limited to, any gear (training or otherwise), weapons, equipment, mats, and any protective gear before each use. Products that show wear should be immediately replaced and not used in any Martial Arts activity.   Martial Arts Bo Staff For Sale Before you allow others to use an AWMA product, you agree that (a) you will require that they (or their legal guardian if they are minors) read, understand, and agree to these Terms and Conditions of Sale or Use, (b) you believe they (or their guardian) understand that they are participating in a high-risk activity and assume the risk of death, paralysis, or other personal injury, and (c) you agree to indemnify, defend, and hold AWMA harmless from any claims made by them arising from their use of any Product.   All weapons sold by AWMA (“Weapons”) are intended for demonstration or display as a collectible item only. Use or misuse of Weapons involves serious risks, including, but not limited to, injury, paralysis, disability, and death. Weapons are sold only for training under expert supervision, for demonstration of forms, collection or display. Inspect weapons before each use to ensure they are in proper condition. If any unsafe, damaged, or defective condition is observed, do not use the Product. Do not use Weapons for sparring or contact.

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Because Products wear down through use and over time, ALWAYS INSPECT ALL Products, including, but not limited to, any gear (training or otherwise), weapons, equipment, mats, and any protective gear before each use. Products that show wear should be immediately replaced and not used in any Martial Arts activity.

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Use of Products MUST be under the supervision of a skilled instructor who responsibly monitors techniques and intensity of training to assure that students or users are properly trained and physically conditioned. Minors using these Products should have constant, qualified, adult supervision. martial arts graphite bo staff The Products might provide varying degrees of protection, but they are not warranted to protect the user from or prevent any injury, paralysis or death. Users are responsible for their choice and use of the Products purchased. Users of these Products can be subject to injuries, including, but not limited to, physical injury, paralysis, or death, despite using the Products as intended. The user must assume full responsibility for all risk of injuries. The manufacturer and distributor assume no liability for injuries, paralysis or death suffered while wearing or using the Products. Sales of certain Weapons are governed by local, state, federal and/or international law. It is Your responsibility to check all applicable laws concerning the use, ownership, legal age and possession of any Weapon before purchasing. By purchasing any Weapon, You warrant that You are in compliance with all local, state, federal and/or international law, and that You are legally able to purchase, possess, and use, and AWMA is legally able to sell to You, all Weapons You purchase from AWMA's website, catalog, or other location.

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Product descriptions, typographic, pricing and photographic errors are unintentional and subject to correction. We regret, but are not liable for such errors. AWMA reserves the right to reject any orders placed for a product listed at an incorrect price. If you discover an error in our website or catalog, please let us know. As set forth above under the limited warranty provisions, AWMA liability is limited to repair or replacement of its products which are returned to it prepaid in the specified period of time. In no event shall AWMA’s liability exceed the value of the products sold. AWMA shall not be liable for any special or consequential damages that result from the use of any product sold through this website or through its catalog. Applicable law may not allow the limitation or exclusion of liability of special or consequential damages so the above limitation or exclusion may not apply to your purchase, but it is intended to be the maximum limitation as permitted by law. All mats purchased from AWMA must be used in accordance with the manufacturer’s warnings, manuals, and labels. Always place mats on a flat, level, even surface. Always follow the manufacturer’s recommended guidelines and disclaimers. The purchaser, user or participant assumes all risk of injury from any use. No Weapon shall be sold to anyone under 18 years of age without parental consent. Some Weapons may be prohibited in your area. Please check state statutes and local ordinances before ordering. Products sold by AWMA include equipment and gear used in boxing, martial arts, mixed martial arts, yoga, fitness, weight training, kick-boxing, competitions and/or demonstration (collectively, “Martial Arts”). Participation in Martial Arts is a high-risk sports activity. Participation in Martial Arts may result in injury, sometimes severe, including, but not limited to, disability, paralysis, or death. You participate in any of these activities at your own risk. You agree to consult with your personal physician before participating in any of these high-risk activities. You, and whoever uses the Products sold by AWMA, use the Products at Your own risk. Read, understand, and follow specific warnings and instructions on Products and in product literature or inserts before using the Products. Save these documents for reference.

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Product weights are approximate and are measured on an averaged ounce per square yard basis. Actual product weights may vary based on various factors, including, but not limited to, the color of the product. AWMA makes no express guarantees or warranties of any kind with respect to actual product weights.